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. >> former city councilman turned civil rights activist is a felon of tax evasion and he makes no bones about it. >> i have been strip offed my right to vote and hold public office. now he's fighting to getel felonsget felonsand convicted felons in the lawsuit. he's asking the judge to rule on his argument that the felon disenfranchisement is unconstitutional in virginia. >> so what that means is that every person, even in prison will have their rights restored. >> cenk: so it's an interesting point. finally on the issue of civil rights here. a lot of people argue that our incarceration of african-americans is a new form of jim crow. is this a way of disenfranchising by another name. >> there is no question. i've written a book on this in some length. there is no question. even though african-americans and whites have about the same level of drug use and drug selling overwhelmingly it's african-americans who are prosecutorprosecutorred, who get these long sentences and then when they come out, there is a connection between civil rights and felony disenfranchisement. how can we allow to get ri
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
for black civil rights. it was about american rights, about human rights, about the rights of the citizen of this nation. as i got older, they reminded me of the clear truth. there were blacks, whites, latinos and asians. there were a gay folks and street books all marching for justice in america. they told me that you need to remember this from the beaches of normandy were there were black folks and white folks and gay folks. you need to remember this. when people were fighting to expand, it everybody involved. we knew we were all in it together. deep and real african proper was true. if you want to go fast you go alone, if you want to go far you go to together. so now it is time we go together. the dream of america is still just as urgent. this is still just as real. we are not finished with this nation yet. the word of our founders, liberty and justice for all, are still as operational as long as there is a person in this country that does not enjoy the same rights as their brother or their sister when it comes to voting rights, when it comes to marriage rights, when it comes to civil
, as the number of briefs that outline for a higher education, business officials, civil rights groups, that outlined support for the use of race at the university of texas, briefs that are in opposition. but broader public opinion, it appears only about a quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is broad support among the same set of voters for preference in college admissions based on income. given these results, it is not surprising that ward connerly, who will be on the panel, has been extremely successful in his efforts to ban affirmative action based on race in a number of states. so far, the efforts are 546. -- five for six. five out of six times, voters, when given the option, have said we should and the option of racial affirmative action at colleges and public employment, including blue states like california, michigan, and washington. the second major problem facing affirmative-action, of course, is the legal issue, which will be joined in the fishe
like you also thought the civil rights movement for african-americans took the opportunity of the franchise to run for office. if you don't like those laws, you become a lawmaker. >> become part of the solution. i think that's -- i want to just say about president obama, he's one of the reasons that people are so mobilized by himment you can identify with him on multiple levels. i like to think of president obama as an immigrant. certainly a child of an immigrant. there are multiple levels at which you can identify with that and it gave people his election also mobilized a lot of different folks to feel that something was possible. >> certainly a cosmopolitan citizen having lived in schools, indonesia, a half sister who was indonesian. as well as american like. that idea of a cosmopolitan person is part what the immigrant story is. grace, i wish you great luck in your campaign. thank you, sayu, robert and chloe are back for me. next we're talking about affirmative action. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the cit
it be civil rights, whether it be, you know workplace safety, you know, how long you work every week, these kind of things are all things that were implemented from the top down and nobody here's going to say that the 40-hour work week was a bad idea. nobody's going to say that. that... that you know people of color can now vote. nobody's going to say that. it just, out of were they very, very popular things when they came out? no, they were not. voting right, voting rights act, civil rights act were very... very vilified in many parts of the country. but the idea that you know obamacare is not the answer, it probably isn't, but something has to be done about this problem and if you don't do anything, which is going to keep ballooning this thing. >> obamacare scares me, you know. i don't want the government knowing my personal issues or my healthcare. i don't want them to tell me that i can't go to a-- my own doctor. and right now my family physician has a sign in the window that says, no obamacare. i'm scared. >> reporter: go ahead, chastity. >> but i think at the end of the day gov
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
workers to the civil-rights campaigns in the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's to the environmental movement. we're taking those lessons and moving forward as we look at a larger pat the militarism. this is not just about libya or somalia or iraq or afghanistan. we're talking about iran, the future, and asking ourselves, how we feel safer when we are involved in more bases and countries than we have been in history? >> dave philipps, place as here today, here in colorado springs. for people across the country who do not understand this city at the foot of the rockies, talk about its military significance for the country. >> and a lot of ways colorado springs is an average town in terms of demographics, in terms of crime rates. just about anything you look at in the senses. the big difference is by far our largest industry, if you want to call it that, is the department of defense. how many active duty to we have here in colorado springs? over 50,000, i believe. that really is the lifeblood of our town. >> this investigation that you did, the unit called lethal warriors, share with us what it is
how african- americans were able to drive legislations in the civil-rights movement and say as a blueprint, let's take the amount of resources we have and you put that with voting and you have a different result. >> we me to go back to that same model and make sure we implement that in this next term. >> if anybody could jump in and answer this, and that is, let's say you go through november, let's say president, democrats, 50% holds up. 90% of black folks hold up. are you going to see african- americans and hispanics make it clear that they have to have an inside and outside game, and that is you have folks on the inside who say we are working with you, but then the extra forces on the outside who are also pushing as well to get what you want, and otherwise be risks folks saying let's don't have an extra row game, all of you are left with is an internal dane, and we can ignore it. that is a danger when it comes to getting what you want. >> i think every time you put all your eggs in one basket there's a danger they will get broken. i disagree that is what happened. the last
code at the university of north carolina. >> all speech must be civil. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is ne
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
, do describe the conflict is a popular revolution based on civil rights, basic human rights and was treating it, if you remember, as a civil war and fighting amongst each other and the government be in one of the fractions. i really frustrated syrians. >> lets ms particular question. now, some of our colleagues would like to chime in with a couple more words. if you promise to be brief. >> i'll be very brief. >> i will be even briefer. >> i just want to say when you talk about issues of negotiation and peace plans, you have to assume that the other party a civilized. when you have the other party using barrel bombs to hit civilian areas, when you have snipers taking our children and bloodlines, this is not a regime you can negotiate an eventual use. this is a regime that has to go. >> in two sentences come i was simply direct you to an interview that is perfected the syrian prime minister has two days ago, in which he said this was for the first time a public that he is gone but the most senior leaders of the baath party, to ask for a cease-fire and for there to be a politic
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
important. the most important civil right is voting. it's with everything else relies on, and the disenfranchisement isn't a casual thing even if it doesn't turn and the election if somebody can't vote in a state that is solid blue or solid red that is also because that person hasn't been able to participate with it changes the outcome, but i think that with the nfl rapid which did get that strike or lockout rather did get settled very quickly after every book on the national television saw the game that went the wrong way, and tragically at me make something like that for the voter i.d. and suppression to get not only the media attention but the judicial attention that it deserves. >> i want you to join in here. so, it from the data perspective the voter suppression is extremely small. i have no idea what the right percentage should be but it is under 1% and another one of the topics that is just way down that we believe should be more a part of the coverage is the money in politics, so the fund raising is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
my party on particular issues. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her
that ron paul has history. what of his histories is the civil rights act of 1964. it valued the property rights of businesses. [inaudible] let's get to the issue of mitt romney. i'm not crazy about everything the president has done but being a businessman does not necessarily qualify you to run a country simply because the demands of a corporation are not the same as those of the nation. guest: one of the things that research has shown is that young people don't score differently on political knowledge questions. the people who are older than them, above 30, -- they may lack some experience but a great deal of young people who have other issues, people are concerned about jobs in the economy. when they have doubled the of employment rate, those people have a great deal of patience on issues in their voices should be heard in their communities and nationally because of that experience and because of our democracy. host: we're heading into the final weeks of the campaign. in the postgraduate realm, 57% are supporting barack obama. some colleges are evenly divided. jonesboro, arkansas, good
of murdering 12 people, james holmes says he's the victim? his civil rights are being violated? then they voted for obama in 2008. what are they thinking now after last night's debate? frank luntz up next with the fascinating revelation. right back. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. >> steve: i love being here in the control room. news by the numbers. $127,000. that's the value of all the jewelry swiped from julianne moore's new york city apartment. the heist happened while the actress was filming a movie in canada. next, one dollar a day. that's how much manhattan teen-agers are paid for cell phone have lays. d -- valets. let's them leave their phones inside while they go to school. $5,600, that's how much virginia car dealership accidentally cut from the price of this chevy suv. but when the custo
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way, going
based on civil rights, based on human rights. and he was street treating it as a civil war and against each other and the government war being one of the infraction and that really frustrated syrians. let's end this question now. some of our colleagues would like to chime in with a couple more words. if you promise to be brief. >> i'll be brief. >> i just want to see when you talk about issues of negotiation and peace plans, you have to assume that the other party is civilized. when you have the other party using bombs to hit civilian areas, when you have snipers taking out children in bread lines, this is not a regem you can neglect a peace. this is a regime that has to go. >> i will simply direct you to an interview that the defected prime minister had two days ago in which he said that this was a first time made public that he had gone with the most senator leaders, the regional command to ask for a cease fire and for there to be a political dialogue. they said no way we will negotiate dialogue with the external opposition, know it is the security solution and a security solution al
, we have the worst civil rights violation in mississippi and the correction in the local and state government in mississippi. lives are being hurt. children are being kidnapped. i was very motivated to your mitt romney talk about the first amendment. >> we will get a couple more calls. back to our twitter stream. -- her ee is one this one says -- ours go to a caller on democrat line. go ahead. caller: i am a registered democrat. i am on a fixed income. i worry about our medicare and social security. people are on fixed incomes and depend on social security and medicare. i will vote for mitt romney. i feel that he is the one to straighten out this country and the mess that it is in. i voted for a bomb at of years ago and i am very disappointed in him -- obama four years ago and i am very disappointed in him. >> what made you decide to vote for mitt romney? >> i think he is the only one who could really get us out of this position that we are in. it can go on like this. i am against obama for what he did and taking 4 $5 billion out of our medicare system and putting it into obamacare
administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in overton who seem toe think the best thing about george bush is he not ronald reagan. >>> largely as a result of the policies and priorities of the reagan administration more people are becoming poor and staying poor in this country than anytime since world war ii. ♪ . >> if there is thinking left to ronald reagan's trickle down theory, done, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickng down through just about every segment of our society. ♪ . >> if you gave clarence thomas a little flower on his face you would think you had david duke talking. here is a man who, is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. ♪ . >> i hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and dies like many black men do of heart disease. that is how i feel. he is absolutely reprehensible person. ♪ . >> you've called gingrich and his ilk, your words, trickle down terrorists who base their agenda on exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class a
. it reads, in any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. defeat jah jahad. >> the ones who are putting these ads together, they are entitled to their bigotry and hate and we descend that right. is this what we need? we need more tolerant messages. >> that ad is sponsored by a group known as the american freedom defense initiative. metro has to display the ad by monday afternoon. >>> new tonight at 11:00, a mistake that can't be hidden. the u.s. military spent millions developing a new camouflage uniform for troops in afghanistan. too bad they didn't conceal the troops. james has more. >> in a case of trying to be good enough for everything, but not being good enough for anything. cost the army millions of dollars and put our soldiers at risk. >> the idea was to develop a camouflage pattern that could be used in multiple environments. urban environment, devert environment, and so on. >> phillip is with the washington guardian. awarded the army their hammer award. >> $6 million on development to the uniforms. >> with the wars in afghanistan and iraq, t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)

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